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Bill St. Arnaud is a R&E Network and Green IT consultant who works with clients on a variety of subjects such as the next generation research and education and Internet networks. He also works with clients to develop practical solutions to reduce GHG emissions such as free broadband and dynamiccharging of eVehicles (See http://green-broadband.blogspot.com/) . View my complete profile

Monday, November 15, 2010

How will we know when the Internet is dead? - the need for an Open Internet

[I recently signed a statement with a large and diverse group of advocates for the Open Internet filed with the FCC under their notice of proposed rulemaking entitled Further Inquiry into Two Under-developed Issues in the Open Internet Proceeding. This is an extremely important undertaking to protect the future of the Open Internet. I will not repeat the arguments made in the statement, but I particularly encourage readers to look at David Reeds eloquent posting on this subject (http://www.reed.com/blog-dpr/?p=47) as well as the excellent summary posted on Ars Technica
(http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2010/11/are-you-on-the-internet-or-something-else.ars)

But I would emphasize there is historical precedent by the FCC (and the Canadian regulator CRTC) to take proactive steps to protect an important telecommunications/information service such as the Open Internet from the predatory practices of incumbent operators. Although it has largely been forgotten about by most cable company CEOs, the entire existence of cablecos in North America is largely due to regulatory actions by the FCC and CRTC in the 1970s and early 80s to protect them from being taken over by the telephone companies, and prohibiting the telephone companies from offer competing video services. In the US the FCC imposed such restrictions on the telcos in order to prevent market concentration , and in Canada it was done for cultural protection reasons. Countries that allowed the telcos to compete with cable companies such as Australia largely killed off this important industry sector in those early years. But in North America as a result of these regulatory prohibitions, a relatively small industry at that time, was allowed to grow and thrive to the point where it can now hire as many lobbyists as the telcos ( a true measure of any mature industry). And like the telcos they now argue vociferously against government interference in the private sector market supposedly created single handedly by themselves.

Given the importance of an Open Internet to our economy and society I would urge regulators to seriously think of the economic and social consequence if we do not protect this important facility of an Open Internet. Special kudos to Seth Johnson for organizing such an incredible group of Internet leaders to sign onto this filing BSA]

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How will we know when the Internet is dead?

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2010/11/are-you-on-the-internet-or-something-else.ars

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Slashdot picks up the Grant Gross/IDG story:

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/10/11/08/235243/Net-Pioneers-Say-Open-

Internet-Should-Be-Separate

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Rob Powell: Definitions, Dialogue, and the FCC

http://www.telecomramblings.com/2010/11/definitions-dialog-and-the-

fcc/

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Joly Macfie/ISOC-NY: Internet to FCC dont mess!

http://www.isoc-ny.org/p2/?p=1403

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Grant Gross: 'Net pioneers: Open Internet should be separate

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http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9195221/_Net_pioneers_Open_Inter

net_should_be_separate

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http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/209919/net_pioneers_open_

internet_should_be_separate.html

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http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/110510-net-pioneers-open-

internet-should.html

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http://www.cio.com/article/633616/_Net_Pioneers_Open_Internet_Should_Be

_Separate

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http://www.itworld.com/government/126709/net-pioneers-open-internet-

should-be-separate

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On Sat, Nov 6, 2010 at 8:17 PM, Seth Johnson



wrote:

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Robin Chase: The Internet is not Triple Play

http://networkmusings.blogspot.com/2010/11/internet-is-not-triple-

play.html

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Jon Lebkowsky: Advocating for the Open Internet:

http://weblogsky.com/2010/11/05/advocating-for-the-open-internet/

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(Very good incisive summary and selection in this.)

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Kenneth Carter: Defining the Open Internet

http://kennethrcarter.com/CoolStuff/2010/11/defining-the-open-

internet/

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David Isenberg: Towards an Open Internet

http://isen.com/blog/2010/11/towards-an-open-internet/

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Paul Jones: Identifying the Internet (for the FCC)

http://ibiblio.org/pjones/blog/identifying-the-internet/

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Gene Gaines posted the Press Release here:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/41150786/Notice-Open-Internet-Advocates-

Urge-the-FCC-on-Praise-Increased-Clarity-11-05-2010

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Brough Turner/Netblazr: Seeking Federal Recognition for the Open

Internet

http://netblazr.com/node/451

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David Weinberger: Identifying the Internet

http://www.hyperorg.com/blogger/2010/11/05/identifying-the-internet/

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On Advancing the Open Internet by Distinguishing it from Specialized

Services:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/41002510/On-Advancing-the-Open-Internet-by-

Distinguishing-it-from-Specialized-Services

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Exclusive: Big Name Industry Pioneers & Experts Push FCC for Open

Internet

http://siliconangle.com/blog/2010/11/05/big-name-industry-pioneers-

experts-push-fcc-for-open-internet/

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David Reed: A Statement from Various Advocates for an Open Internet


Why I Signed On

http://www.reed.com/blog-dpr/?p=47

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